2.4mR GREAT LAKES REGATTA – Aug 17/18

Sailboat Racing - CAN 8

This past weekend, the 3rd regatta of the 2.4mR CanAm North Regatta Series was hosted by National Yacht Club. Participants traveled from Florida, Maryland, Connecticut, Wisconsin, Montreal and Ottawa to compete with the local NYC 2.4 fleet.

The 15 boat fleet sailed 7 races to complete the regatta. In 3rd place was NYC’s Darrell Suderman, in 2nd place, Dee Smith of Annapolis, and in 1st place, NYC’s Allan Liebel.

North Sails

The 2.4mR Canadian Championship, hosted by NYC on Sept 7/8, will be the fourth regatta of the 2.4mR CanAm North Series. We are pleased to announce that North Sails will be sponsoring our CanAm North finale. All participants of the finale will be entered into a draw for a North TR-1 jib.

2.4mR Sailboats Racing

David Foscarini

The regatta spirit got rolling Friday with the out of town boats arriving and being assembled. The 2.4mR fleet is always interesting for the mix of able and disable sailors. With the abled sailor helping the disabled sailors rig and launch. A few people even got out for a sail late Friday afternoon. Saturday started with light rain that ends as we arrived at NYC. Boats got launched. Clothing choices were made. We sailed out to the course in light air. Richard and his Race Committee got a course set and we were into our first race a little after 11:00. The fleet doesn’t get stretched to long so we managed to get in the full complement of four races in. We also managed to all arrive safely at the dock as a squall hit. The big increase in wind and pouring rain only lasted a few (long) minutes. Boats were put away and the cooking and eating started, along with an array of beverages to re-hydrate.

Sunday morning came around with more rain and no wind! The RC assured us there would be wind and promptly left the dock. We arrived at the race course some by tow, some in zephyrs of breeze. We all drifted around until the wind (barely) settled in at about 3.5 Knots. The wind never got above 6 knots and shifted a little back and forth. We managed to get in 3 races by 2:45. The RC then sent us in calling it a regatta, with a drop.

Back on shore priority was given to out of towners to pull their boats and get equipment packed onto trailer and trucks.

The 2019 2.4mR Great lakes Championships had 15 boats from Montreal, Ottawa, Florida, Maryland, Connecticut, and NYC. 3rd place was NYC’s Darrel Suderman, 2nd place Dee Smith of Annapolis, and 1st NYC’s Allan Liebel.

Many thanks to Richard McKean and the group of race committee volunteers. Special thanks to John King and the Sea Scouts for helping the disabled sailors rig and de rig their boats. Thanks to Able Sail Toronto for a place to park the disabled sailors boats for the weekend.

This event was the third in the CanAm North summer series. The final event is the 2.4mR Canadian Championship at NYC September 7 & 8.

Complete Results can be found here.

Rockin In the Two Point Four

Lyrics by Audrey Kobayashi

Rockin, rockin, rockin in the 2 point four
The wind is fine on Lake Ontario
And we’re rockin in the two point four

(Chorus) Talk-in’ ’bout, Hey now! Hey now! Rockin in the two point four
Jock-a-mo fee-no ai na-né, ROCKIN IN THE TWO POINT FOUR

Look at Dee he’s the king of the waves
Rockin in the two point four
But Alan’s so cool and can take the day
Rockin in the two point four

Now Tony’s fast and he puts on the gas
Rockin in the two point four
But If Darrell’s around he might give it a pass
Rockin in the two point four

Peter’s there and he’s off from the start
Rocking in the two point four
But Janice is smart and sails straight from the heart
Rockin in the two point four

Tim comes on like a real rock star
Rockin in the two point four
But Charlie’s fierce and won’ let him get far
Rockin in the two point four

Christine is keen to reach the top of the fleet
Rockin in the two point four
But Aaron is sly when he pulls in the sheets
Rockin in the two point four

Now Wendy might be chasing the pack
Rockin in the two point four
But Brian and Matt better watch their backs
Rockin in the two point four

Jan is new and Mike is too
Rockin in the two point four
A force to reckon with – just give em a few
Rockin in the two point four

See that Audrey all dressed in black
Rockin in the two point four
She’ll be okay if you let her tack
Rockin in the two point four

We’re all thinking bout those that we miss
Rockin in the two point
Alain Ted Peter Kevin Julio and Trish
Rockin in the two point four

Rockin, rockin, rockin in the 2 point four
The wind is fine on Lake Ontario
And we’re rockin in the two point four

Smith Wins The Finale and The 2019 2.4mR Can Am Championship Series

Increasingly Competitive North American 2.4mR Series Drives Class Growth

Port Charlotte, Fla. (April 2, 2019) – Can Am #5, also known as The Finale, closed out the winter racing season for the 2.4mR class on Charlotte Harbor with 21 competitors racing over three days (March 29-31).

Annapolis sailor Dee Smith, the current U.S. and North American Champion, crossed the finish first in eight of the nine races to take the win of The Finale. “The regatta was very good for everyone,” said Smith. “The conditions were near perfect and there was a very good fight for second with Tony Pocklington beating out Allan Leibel on a tie break. The first two days were shifty and puffy. The second race on day two was a challenge with light air and the race that gave Tony the tie break. He was deep around the last mark and sailed around everyone to drift across the line for the win. For me, I just kept clear and sailed my race…I had good starts and went the right way, except that run in which I finished fourth and which became my drop race.”

With his string of first-place finishes, Smith ended the regatta with an insurmountable low score of eight points. He was followed in the final standings by Tony Pocklington, of Ft. Myers, Fla., and Allan Leibel of Toronto, Canada, each with 31 points. Two more Canadian sailors, Bruce Millar and Louise Anstey, who both hail from Victoria, B.C., each were second across the line in two races, and finished the regatta fourth and fifth with 33 and 39 points, respectively.

Bruce Millar at Can Am #5
Bruce Millar at Can Am #5
2019 2.4mR Can Am Championship Series/Fran Burstein

Anstey raced her first 2.4mR event in the Can Am series two years ago, having grown up sailing numerous one-design classes from El Toro dinghies to Fireballs, Lasers and Solings, as well as racing various PHRF keelboats. She started sailing a borrowed 2.4mR to be a sparring partner for Jackie Gay (who went on to win a Paralympic silver medal in the SKUD class). In her two years in the 2.4mR class, Anstey has observed that the racing in the Can Am series is getting much tighter.

“Those in the mid-fleet are pushing the leaders more and taking a few places away from them,” said Anstey. “The same is true of those who used to be a little farther back. I suspect the regular racing in a reasonable sized fleet that the 2.4mR Can Am Championship Series offers is a big factor in the increased competitiveness…and it remains friendly competition. I find the sailors in the class are helpful and willing to share information. It is the kind of support that makes me feel welcome and want to return for another event.”

The Finale was the fifth event in the 2019 2.4mR Can Am Championship which started last December. Over the course of the season 30 sailors, representing Canada, Guatemala, Norway, The Virgin Islands and the U.S.A., competed in one or more events. Open only to sailors racing the Norlin MkIII One Design, the Championship Trophy winner was determined from the results of all five regattas after his or her worst event was dropped from the scoring. Smith, who won three of the five events, came out on top. Bruce Millar, winner of the Edge Midwinters, followed by Allan Leibel, winner of Can Am #4, rounded out the top-three in the season championship standings.

“The fleet is getting stronger every regatta. Sailing in Port Charlotte is both challenging and warm. Everyone has a good time and the Charlotte Harbor Yacht Club does a great job,” concluded Smith.

Peter Wood, President of the Canadian class association and a long-time 2.4mR competitor concurred with Smith’s assessment of the competition and yacht club support, and also cited positive developments that came out of the season and which bode well for the class in future years. “First, there have been a number of new faces in the class including a group of sailors from Marblehead and a new sailor from Milwaukee whom we expect to see at regattas in Newport and Kingston [CAN] this summer,” said Wood. “The efforts by Bruce Millar and Tony Pocklington to further develop the jib boom rig for the 2.4mR will expand the population of sailors who can sail these boats. Bruce sailed a jib boom boat in the final regatta with good results.”

The continued support of the volunteers at Charlotte Harbor Yacht Club has also ensured that the fourth edition of the series – the 2020 2.4mR Can Am Championship Series – will return to Charlotte Harbor next winter.

“The Can Am series has helped bring the widespread North American 2.4mR fleet together,” said Tony Pocklington, President of the US 2.4mR class. “That consolidation has definitely motivated participation. We are very lucky to have a great venue for the Can Am Championship Series. Race committee, affordability, and race area are all perfect for our class, and help to showcase the technical, competitive aspects of the 2.4mR. Word of the consistent and competitive racing has spread, and we are seeing growth in the New England area, here in southwest Florida, and in Canada, specifically Victoria, Vancouver, and Toronto, where similar Can Am series (West and North) are being planned. Toronto is planning an inaugural event for this summer. Overall, the future is looking optimistic for our North American 2.4mR Norlin MkIII One Design class.”

Full results for the 2019 2.4mR Championship Series may be found by following this link http://www.regattanetwork.com/event/17843#_newsroom and clicking on Race Results.

Full results for Can Am #5, The Finale Regatta, may be found here; and full results for the earlier events in the season as available as well: 2018 2.4mR North American Championship may be found here; 2018 2.4mR U.S. Nationals results may be found here; 2019 Edge Midwinters results are here; and full results for Can Am #4 are here.

About the 2.4mR: The 2.4mR originated in 1983 in Sweden and attained confirmation as an international class less than 10 years later. Class racing puts the emphasis on the tactical – not physical – skills of the sailor as the single-handed boats are equal under the strict rules that govern the class. With a length of 13’ 8” and the advantage of being easily transported and stored, this sleek keelboat has gained favor with a wide range of able-bodied sailors and sailors with disabilities (there are 1200 boats worldwide, with roughly 200 in North America). For more information on the class, please visit http://www.canada24mr.com/ or www.us24meter.org/ and follow us on Facebook at US 2.4mR Class

(end)

Leibel Dominates for the Win of Can Am #4

Port Charlotte, Fla. (February 27, 2019) – Can Am #4, the penultimate regatta of the five-event 2019 2.4mR Can Am Championship, saw 20 competitors – the largest fleet of the season – get to work on the waters of Charlotte Harbor from February 22-24. Although missing veteran 2.4mR class competitors Janice Graham-Foscarini, Louise Anstey and Audrey Kobayashi, the addition of Guatemalan racer Rodolfo Quezada; the three Massachusetts sailors (Jerry Blouin, Shan McAdoo and Doug Trees) who are building a new Marblehead-based 2.4mR fleet; and class newcomers Geoff Moehl of Orlando and Patrick Reiss of Bonita Springs, made for an exciting weekend of racing.

The races on day one started in an eight-knot southeasterly breeze which died near the end of the first race, forcing the race committee to postpone racing for an hour. With the racecourse relocated to the west, a light sea breeze filled which allowed the second race to be completed on a rising tide. By the third and final race of the day, the southwesterly had built to 12 knots. Three sailors from Canada dominated the day, with Allan Leibel of Toronto winning the first race, Peter Eagar, also from Toronto, winning race two and British Columbia’s Bruce Millar winning race three.

2.4mR boats at windward mark

2019 CanAm Championship Series/Fran Burstein

The Race Committee had less than five knots to work with as they set up for the planned three races on day two. However, once the new line was set after a shift in wind direction and subsequent relocation of the course to the west, the southwesterly breeze built into the mid-teens for the remainder of the day. The relatively minor oscillations provided few opportunities for competitors that needed to overcome bad starts.

Leibel, who represented Canada in the 1972 and 1976 Olympics (in the Dragon and Tempest, respectively), crossed the finish line first in all three of the day’s races to win the event.

“The racing was wonderful,” said Leibel, who has been racing a 2.4mR for 10 years. “The conditions were ideal. On the second day the wind blew perfectly steady… no shifts… no changes in velocity. It became a boat speed contest and I happened to be fastest.”

Leibel’s enthusiasm for the class was apparent when he admitted his goal for next month’s final event of the season isn’t to win. “I’m doing the last event because I love it [racing the 2.4mR] so much.” Leibel explained that he first got into the class to help Bruce Millar, who was training for the Paralympics and needed coaching and competition. “A group of us started sailing his second boat to help him. I stayed with the class. Love it as a sailboat. I still have an Etchells, but the 2.4mR is a top performing boat with less demands from a logistical standpoint. We have roughly a dozen 2.4mRs in Toronto, but the class is huge in Europe and the competition is great.”

2018 2.4mR North American Champion Dee Smith of Annapolis, Maryland, placed second with 11 points, three points behind Leibel. Millar, winner of the Edge Sailing Midwinters in January, finished in third with 12 points, followed by Tony Pocklington, of Fort Myers, Fla., fourth overall with 17 points. Charlie Rosenfield of Woodstock, Conn., completes the top-five with 27 points. Full results for Can Am #4 may be found here.

The third edition of the 2.4 Meter Can Am Championship series will conclude with the nine-race 2019 CanAm Championship Finale, from March 29-31. The series champion will be determined from the results of all five regattas after his or her worst event is dropped from the scoring. For competitors who did not race in all five events, the scoring will count all events sailed (i.e. they will not drop their worst result).

Details of the regatta schedules, social events, hotels and more may be found in the Notice of Race, available here. Full results for the 2018 2.4mR North American Championship may be found here; and for the 2018 2.4mR U.S. Nationals, results may be found here. Full results for the 2019 Edge Midwinters may be found here.

About the 2.4mR: The 2.4mR originated in 1983 in Sweden and attained confirmation as an international class less than 10 years later. Class racing puts the emphasis on the tactical – not physical – skills of the sailor as the single-handed boats are equal under the strict rules that govern the class. With a length of 13’ 8” and the advantage of being easily transported and stored, this sleek keelboat has gained favor with a wide range of able-bodied sailors and sailors with disabilities (there are 1200 boats worldwide, with roughly 200 in North America). For more information on the class, please visit http://www.canada24mr.com/ or www.us24meter.org/ and follow us on Facebook at US 2.4mR Class

2.4mRs Race in Frozen Assets Regatta 2019 RVYC 16th & 17th February

AKA ‘Careful What You Wish For’

Jackie Gay

‘Wanna come and freeze your assets off?’ I said, in an email to our sturdy 2.4mR group, in mid January, when Victoria was bathed in spring-like temperatures. ‘Sign up! It’ll be fun.’ Then a few days before the regatta Victoria received its biggest dump of snow in 40 odd years and John and myself were trapped in the house, let alone capable of getting to any regatta… Fortunately the melt came quickly, the temperature-rise less so, so getting kitted out required the full 2.4mR regalia of multiple layers, wrist-seals, neck-seals, toques, spare-toques and of course (‘every time you go to sea,’ as Louise Anstey astutely noted) sunglasses.

With seven entries our fleet was second in size only to the Radials, and joined by Chris Maier from CFSA, his first time racing the boat. On Saturday the wind looked classic Victoria ‘light and fluky’ but actually settled down to a decent SW-ish and we had six excellent races with Louise giving me and Doug Bell some lessons in what we should and (mostly) shouldn’t be doing. With all classes racing on the same course everyone had to be hyper-aware – a 49er needs a lot of room from our slim wee 2.4s at the leeward mark… Louise won the day with excellent tight racing. On Sunday it was cold and clear with a brisk northerly, waves, strong current and COLD. Oak Bay was a fine sight with the snowy mountains circling us, skiffs flying around (and some swimming…) and even tighter racing in the 2.4mR fleet, with overlapped finishes and a stellar bullet for Delani Hulme-Lawrence. Louise won the event with Jackie second and Doug third, but the real winner was our fleet which can only improve with such tight, competitive racing and new participants. Thanks to the Race Committee for sterling work managing all the fleets; the coaches for encouragement, food and dry clothing; and all the sailors who made this event a real spectacle and a whole lot of fun.

Millar Wins 2019 Edge Sailing Midwinters

2.4mR CanAm 2019

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT:
 [dot][at][dot]">Jan Harley, Media Pro International, 401-683-8224

Event Three of the 2019 CanAm Championship Series

Port Charlotte, Fla. (January 29, 2019) – Sixteen competitors took to the waters of Charlotte Harbor over the weekend of January 25-27 for the 2019 Edge Sailing Midwinters — event three in the five-event 2.4 Meter Can Am Championship series. Unlike the previous two events, which each saw four competitors rack up first-place finishes in the 20-strong fleet, the leaderboard for the Edge Sailing Midwinters was dominated by two veteran racers:  2015 2.4mR North American Champion Bruce Millar, of Victoria, British Columbia, and 2018 2.4mR North American Champion Dee Smith of Annapolis, Maryland.

On the first day of racing, featuring overcast skies, intermittent rain, and eight to 10 knots of breeze with gusts to 14 from the north-northeast, four races were run. And while the Race Committee was obliged to make course changes due to shifts in the breeze and pressure changes in three races, the ebb tide and flat water were not adverse factors for the competitors. 

In the first race, Millar picked up a 17-point penalty after confusion at a mark rounding resulted in his being disqualified from that race. However, he rebounded quickly by winning the subsequent two races and placing second in the final race of the day. Smith, meanwhile, finished 1-2-2-1 in those races, to finish the day at the top of the leaderboard with six points to Millar’s 21. 

On the second day of racing, the forecast was for gusts to 35 knots, which, fortunately, never materialized. However, the squall that came through during race one, bringing sometimes heavy, intermittent rain, turned into a consistent torrent during race two that was not enhanced by the 55-degree temperatures. Only the two races were sailed, with Smith winning the first, and Millar winning the second. 

Notably, Smith did not sail the final race of the regatta, mistakenly thinking he had secured the win. “Of course, I didn’t do my math very well,” said Smith. “Racing with Bruce was very close the whole regatta. I won the first one, he won the next two, I won the next two. The last race that I sailed, I was over the line early, had to go back and grind my way through the fleet. I was one boat length behind Bruce at the weather mark…stayed the same on the run, and we took different marks at the gate. When we crossed the next time, I had the lead and did not look back. I thought I won the regatta.”

On the last leg of the final race, after a short tacking duel with Tony Pocklington, of Fort Myers, Fla., Millar prevailed to cross the finish line first to win the regatta. Tied on seven points with Millar, Smith lost the tie-breaker which is decided by the scores in the last race sailed. 

Pocklington’s scoreline for the regatta, 4-6-[7]-4-4-2, placed him third overall with 20 points. The close competition included a photo finish, also in that last race, for Tim Ripley, of Randolph, N.J., and Charlie Rosenfield of Woodstock, Conn., who crossed the line, respectively, third and fourth. Rosenfield took fourth overall in the standings with 22 points, while Peter Eagar of Toronto, Canada, took fifth with 24 points.

“I personally don’t have a preferred condition,” said Millar after securing the win of the 2019 Edge Sailing Midwinters.  “I don’t worry about whether its heavy or light. I like to be at the top [of the results], but I don’t want that to be my focus and I figure the result will come. Dee is a fantastic sailor. We all know he is the sailor that starts the best and he has years and years of experience. It’s something you have to contend with. I have very good boat speed…I can match him, so it puts me together with him a lot of the time if I’m doing my job right. It just takes one mistake and that is the difference between one position. It pushes you hard and makes you think all the time and that’s why I enjoy the sport, because it’s a thinking game.”

Racing for the third edition of the 2.4 Meter Can Am Championship series will resume February 22-24 with CanAm #4. The nine-race 2019 CanAm Championship Finale, from March 29-31, will see a regatta winner as well as the determination of the series champion from the results of all five regattas after his or her worst event is dropped from the scoring. For competitors who do not race in all five events, the scoring will count all events sailed (i.e. they will not drop their worst result). Leading the current standings for the 2019 CanAm Championship Series is Dee Smith with five points. He is followed by Bruce Millar with eight points. Tony Pocklington has moved into third with 17 points, just one point ahead of Allan Leibel. Peter Eagar rounds out the top-five with 21 points.

Details of the regatta schedules, social events, hotels and more may be found in the Notice of Race, available here. Full results for the 2019 Edge Midwinters may be found at http://www.regattanetwork.com/event/17798#_newsroom

Links to the results for the first two events in the 2019 Can Am Championship Series are: 2018 2.4mR North American Championship http://www.regattanetwork.com/event/17779#_newsroom ; and 2018 2.4mR U.S. Nationals http://www.regattanetwork.com/event/17797#_newsroom

About the 2.4mR: The 2.4mR originated in 1983 in Sweden and attained confirmation as an international class less than 10 years later. Class racing puts the emphasis on the tactical – not physical – skills of the sailor as the single-handed boats are equal under the strict rules that govern the class. With a length of 13’ 8” and the advantage of being easily transported and stored, this sleek keelboat has gained favor with a wide range of able-bodied sailors and sailors with disabilities (there are 1200 boats worldwide, with roughly 200 in North America). For more information on the class, please visit http://www.canada24mr.com/ or www.us24meter.org/

RVYC Inaugural 2.4mR Ice Bowl 2018

December 29, 2018
by Jackie Gay

Even for us out here on the balmy west coast of Canada, the day of Victoria Fleet’s first 2.4mR Ice Bowl Regatta did not look promising, classic ‘socked in’ winter weather where we couldn’t see the end of the bay and LOTS of rain. However 10 hardy/brave/foolish (depending on who you ask…) souls suited up and headed out onto Cadboro Bay. Surprisingly, the wind was consistent throughout the day in speed if not direction, and the southerly arguing with the westerly made for some shifty, interesting racing. The day belonged to Louise Anstey who scored 6 points out of 5 races, followed by Doug Bell on 10 points and Jackie Gay on 12. With the fleet tight on all mark roundings and anything possible on each leg we were all fully engaged and had a whole lot of soggy fun, a great celebration of our growing fleet and high level racing that would have kept the best in the world on their toes!

Many thanks to Louise Anstey for her sterling work organizing, Bruce Millar and his dedicated (and damp…) race committee and David Bleakney for initiating the idea. It was great to reflect on the small beginnings of our fleet back in the days when David, Rod Mack and I were swapping in and out of the two borrowed boats and chasing Bruce around the bay. #keepchasing!

Results are available here: https://www.rvyc.bc.ca/RacingApps/Results/html/1546574309.htm

2019 CanAm Championship Series Draws 20 2.4mR Competitors

2.4mR CanAm 2019

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT:
 [dot][at][dot]">Jan Harley, Media Pro International, 401-683-8224

Smith Takes National and North American Titles in Back-to-Back Regattas

Port Charlotte, Fla. (December 13, 2018) – While most of the U.S.A. was getting smacked by an early taste of wintry weather and unseasonably cold temperatures, the conditions were more than ideal for sailors in the 2.4 Meter class as they kicked off the 2019 CanAm Championship Series at Charlotte Harbor Yacht Club (CHYC) in Port Charlotte, Florida. With at least nine competitors from Canada, two from the Virgin Islands, one from Norway, and Americans coming from as far as Seattle and San Diego, a fleet of 20 started the championship series with back-to-back regattas on the Peace River.

The 2019 CanAm Championship Series gets underway in Charlotte Harbor, Florida. (credit: 2019 CanAm Championship Series/Fran Burstein)

First up on the series schedule was the 2.4mR North American Championship, December 3-5, 2018, which got underway in light, shifty breeze from the north. On the first day of racing, the fleet of 20 saw three winners in as many races: Canada’s Bruce Millar, from Victoria, British Columbia, won the first race; Norway’s Bjornar Erikstad took the win of race two; and Dee Smith of Annapolis, Maryland, won the last race of the day.  On day two, with breeze of 12-15 knots from the north-northeast, the sailors faced a challenging chop in the starting area that, fortunately, diminished near the top of the course which was set closer to shore. Day two saw Smith resume his winning style with bullets in the first two races of the day before finishing third in the final race of the event. Canada’s Allan Leibel, of Toronto, won that final race to end the regatta tied on 15 points with Bruce Millar, and Erikstad, with 12 points, finished second to Smith who won the North American title on seven points. Canada’s Peter Eagar, of Toronto, finished fifth overall with 30 points.

The 2.4mR U.S. National Championship, held December 6-9, started under sunny skies with a seven-knot breeze from the east-northeast. Despite the shifty, diminishing breeze, the Race Committee was able to run four races and, once again, it was Bruce Millar across the finish line first in the opening race. Dee Smith powered up for back-to-back wins of races two and three, with the final race of the day won by Charlie Rosenfield of Woodstock, Conn. Day two saw similar conditions, with a diminishing breeze from the east-southeast shifting to the southeast as the day progressed. It was another day of close racing as evidenced, again, by three winners in as many races: Millar won race five, and Janice Graham-Foscarini, of Toronto, Canada, won race six before Smith won the last race of the day. The fourth race planned for the day was abandoned when the wind died. With a cold front pushing its way into the Port Charlotte area, bringing lightning and gusts up to 35 knots, it forced the cancellation of the final day of racing and the championship was decided on seven races, including a discard for each sailor of their worst finish. Smith claimed the 2019 U.S. National Championship title with nine points; Bruce Millar was second with 21 points, followed by Tony Pocklington, of Ft. Myers, Fla., and Bjornar Erikstad, tied with 24 points each. Allan Leibel, with 36 points, rounded out the top-five.

“Racing was tight all week,” said Smith after earning the two championship titles. “Conditions varied from drifting to 22 knots. Many different boats won races and you had to stay on top of the big shifts and wind lines to get good scores. I was lucky enough to put a good string of strong finishes together for the week, but it was not easy.”

Racing for the third edition of the 2.4 Meter Can Am Championship series will resume January 25-27 when the 2019 Edge Sailing Midwinters will be contested, followed by CanAm #4 from February 22-24.  The series concludes with the nine-race 2019 CanAm Championship Finale from March 29-31, with the series champion determined from the results of all five regattas after his or her worst score is discarded.  For competitors who do not race in all five events, the scoring will count all events sailed (i.e. they will not drop their worst result). Leading the current standings for the 2019 CanAm Championship Series is Dee Smith with two points. He is followed by Bruce Millar and Bjornar Erikstad, who are tied with six points each; Allan Leibel in fourth overall on eight points; and Peter Eagar rounds out the top-five with 11 points.

Details of the regatta schedules, social events, hotels and more may be found in the Notice of Race, available here.  Full results for the 2018 2.4mR North American Championship may be found here; and for the 2018 2.4mR U.S. Nationals, results may be found here

 

About the 2.4mR:  The 2.4mR originated in 1983 in Sweden and attained confirmation as an international class less than 10 years later.  Class racing puts the emphasis on the tactical – not physical – skills of the sailor as the single-handed boats are equal under the strict rules that govern the class.  With a length of 13’ 8” and the advantage of being easily transported and stored, this sleek keelboat has gained favor with a wide range of able-bodied sailors and sailors with disabilities (there are 1200 boats worldwide and roughly 200 in the USA alone).  For more information on the class, please visit http://www.canada24mr.com/ or www.us24meter.org/and follow us on Facebook at US 2.4mR Class